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Right side view of a Honda Supermono 644. If anybody has more information on this bike, please let me know. 1996 Honda 644SuperMono
Added by bigjohn1107.hotmail.com on 11-May-2011

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Right side view of a Honda Supermono 644. If anybody has more information on this bike, please let me know. - Honda 644SuperMono - ID: 342


02-Jun-01 - jrquiles929rr.cs.com - nice
12-Jul-01 - c.martin.jaguar-racing.com - i see a bit of bimota db2
28-Dec-01 - parttimeninja2001.hotmail.com - Very interesting bike. Anyone remember the 'Sound of Singles' race series?
29-Dec-01 - primalurgesracing.yahoo.com - This bike is already causing problems I know. I can hear it now. "Hi back again. This is the 3rd set of knee pucs this weekend and it's only Friday afternoon"!
29-Dec-01 - eddiealbergen.hotmail.com - Only the back could be from a DB2 I thin, but I like the bike ! !
29-Dec-01 - exup92.hotmail.com - I've seen this in a magazine. Really like it. Did they ever sell it?


Extreme Fairings



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More Information on the Honda 644SuperMono
Honda is the largest motorcycle manufacturer in Japan and has been since it started production in 1955.[12] At its peak in 1982, Honda manufactured almost three million motorcycles annually. By 2006 this figure had reduced to around 550,000 but was still higher than its three domestic competitors.[12] During the 1960s, when it was a small manufacturer, Honda broke out of the Japanese motorcycle market and began exporting to the U.S. Working with the advertising agency Grey Advertising, Honda created an innovative marketing campaign, using the slogan "You meet the nicest people on a Honda." In contrast to the prevailing negative stereotypes of motorcyclists in America as tough, antisocial rebels, this campaign suggested that Honda motorcycles were made for the everyman. The campaign was hugely successful; the ads ran for three years, and by the end of 1963 alone, Honda had sold 90,000 motorcycles.[13]:{{{1}}} Taking Honda's story as an archetype of the smaller manufacturer entering a new market already occupied by highly dominant competitors, the story of their market entry, and their subsequent huge success in the U.S. and around the world, has been the subject of some academic controversy. Competing explanations have been advanced to explain Honda's strategy and the reasons for their success.[35] The first of these explanations was put forward when, in 1975, Boston Consulting Group (BCG) was commissioned by the UK government to write a report explaining why and how the British motorcycle industry had been out-competed by its Japanese competitors. The report concluded that the Japanese firms, including Honda, had sought a very high scale of production (they had made a large number of motorbikes) in order to benefit from economies of scale and learning curve effects. It blamed the decline of the British motorcycle industry on the failure of British managers to invest enough in their businesses to profit from economies of scale and scope.[36] 2004 Honda Super Cub The second explanation was offered in 1984 by Richard Pascale, who had interviewed the Honda executives responsible for the firm's entry into the U.S. market. As opposed to the tightly focused strategy of low cost and high scale that BCG accredited to Honda, Pascale found that their entry into the U.S. market was a story of "miscalculation, serendipity, and organizational learning" – in other words, Honda's success was due to the adaptability and hard work of its staff, rather than any long term strategy.[37] For example, Honda's initial plan on entering the US was to compete in large motorcycles, around 300 cc. Honda's motorcycles in this class suffered performance and reliability problems when ridden the relatively long distances of the US highways.[13]:41–43 When the team found that the scooters they were using to get themselves around their U.S. base of San Francisco attracted positive interest from consumers that they fell back on selling the Super Cub instead.[13]:41–43 The most recent school of thought on Honda's strategy was put forward by Gary Hamel and C. K. Prahalad in 1989. Creating the concept of core competencies with Honda as an example, they argued that Honda's success was due to its focus on leadership in the technology of internal combustion engines.[38] For example, the high power-to-weight ratio engines Honda produced for its racing bikes provided technology and expertise which was transferable into mopeds. Honda's entry into the U.S. motorcycle market during the 1960s is used as a case study for teaching introductory strategy at business schools worldwide.
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The photo 1996-Honda-644SuperMono-342.jpg (1996 Honda 644SuperMono - Right side view of a Honda Supermono 644. If anybody has more information on this bike, please let me know.) was uploaded by: bigjohn1107@hotmail.com.
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